Friday, July 13, 2012

2011-2012 MISRGO Annual Evaluation Report



MISRGO 2011-2012 Annual Evaluation Report.


Introduction

The majority of MISRGO grantees have met or exceeded their annual performance goals.  They are engaged in a host of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended tobacco prevention interventions.  They are teaching parents and law enforcement officers about Act 811, helping to establish tobacco-free parks, convincing organizations to extend their perimeter policies, conducting storefront surveys, conducting compliance checks, convincing cities to establish point of purchase policies, convincing HIV positive individuals to stop using tobacco, implementing cessation curriculum, and encouraging citizens to use the Quitline.





They are working in schools to engage youth, convincing them to enroll in tobacco prevention and cessation programs.   They are also developing productive coalitions and partnerships.  According to Dr. Paul Halverson, Director of the Arkansas Department of Health:

Madison County Health Coalition and its partners, including Students Trying to Reduce the Use of Tobacco (STRUT), have produced two 30-second radio spots – one in English, one in Spanish, both voiced by students – to air on area stations.  These show what happens when a network of community and school partners work together (2012).

MISRGO grantees are also using social media extensively to reach youth and young adults, including Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and YouTube.

MISRGO grantees have broad-based support across the State for their tobacco prevention work.  (See MISRGO Empowerment Evaluation, June 2011 Annual Report, Fetterman, Tremain, and Delaney, 2011.)

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to present grantee progress at the end of the 2011-2012 fiscal year.  MISRGO grantees adhere to the CDC’s approved and recommended intervention or goal areas (Starr, et al, 2005). They include:

·           Area 1:  Eliminate Exposure to Secondhand Smoke
·           Area 2:  Preventing Initiation Among Youth and Young Adults
·           Area 3:  Promoting Quitting Among Youth and Adults
·          Area 4:  Addressing Disparities

The report has been organized according to these CDC tobacco intervention areas.  The findings of this report are presented in terms of grantee accomplishments as measured against annual goals. 

The majority of MISRGO grantees have exceeded their annual goals in each of the CDC intervention areas.   The percentage of MISRGO grantees exceeding their annual goals is presented below.  The table is organized according to tobacco intervention areas. 



The remainder of this report highlights grantee progress concerning annual goals, according to CDC intervention area.




Findings

Area 1:  Eliminating Exposure to Secondhand Smoke

The overwhelming majority of grantees have met or exceeded their annual goals concerning Area 1:  Eliminating Exposure to Secondhand Smoke (94%).  Activities focused on policy and perimeter laws.  They also included education and YES tour activities. 

Details include:

·            100,392 residents received information about Act 811
·            3,416 parents and law enforcement officers educated about Act 811
·            1,565 smoke-free homes/cars
·            376 African American church attendees signed petitions supporting smoke free policies (including smoke free church campuses)
·           277 smoke-free home/car pledges
·           39 organizations supported smoke free policies
·           20 businesses supported smoke bans/policies
·           17 parks adopted tobacco-free policies or ordinances
·           16 landlords adopted smoke-free policies
·           14 YES Team members recruited
·           12 storefront surveillance visits conducted
·           7 public buildings expanded buffer zone policy
·           4 faith-based organizations pledged to implement tobacco-free perimeter policies
·           4 organizations serving the Latino population, adopted smoke-free perimeter policies
·           2 smoke-free church campus policies established
·          1 teen tobacco youth program established

 

Grantees meeting or exceeding annual goals include:  ADHC, Asian Pacific, Calhoun, CTFA, EBCTCP, Family Youth, Future Builders, FYEN, In His Image, Legacy, Madison, MCCTFA, NWATFC, SWACDC, We Care, and Wells Bayou.

Approximately 6% have not met their annual goals.  They have been contacted and made aware of the results of their efforts as compared with their peers. 

Area 2:  Preventing Initiation Among Youth and Young Adults

The majority of grantees have met or exceeded their annual goals concerning Area 2:  Preventing Initiation Among Youth and Young Adults (95%).  Activities focused on storefront surveys, YES Teams, and educating youth. 

Details include:

·           3,591 youth became more aware about the danger of smoking and pregnancy
·           934 youth were educated about the dangers of tobacco use
·          440 youth were exposed to information about the dangers of second hand smoke
·           390 minority youth pledged to remain tobacco free
·           348 youth trained in guerilla marketing
·           201 compliance checks passed - sales to minors compliance rate
·           150 storefront surveys
·           34 youth educated with Keeping It Real Curriculum
·           6 YES Teams established
·           1 city established a point of purchase policy


Grantees meeting or exceeding annual goals include:  AHDC, Asian Pacific, Calhoun, CTFA, EBCTCP, Family Services, Family Youth Enrichment, In His Image, Legacy, Madison, MCCTFA, NWATFC, SWACDC, and Wells Bayou.

Approximately 5% have not met their annual goals.  They have been contacted and made aware of their progress to-date in comparison to other grantees.

Area 3:  Promoting Quitting Among Youth and Adults

The majority of grantees have met or exceeded their annual goals concerning Area 3:  Promoting Quitting Among Youth and Adults (88%).  Activities focused on encouraging youth to call the Quitline, informing African Americans and Latinos about the dangers of tobacco use, and educating youth in school-based programs.  In addition, grantees implemented the 40 Days to Freedom Cessation Curriculum.

Details include:

·           321 young adults called the Quitline
·           172 African American and Latinos informed about the dangers of tobacco use
·           75 individuals participated in cessation programs
·           43 youth participated in school-based cessation programs
·           15 HIV positive individuals quit smoking
·           15 African Americans quite smoking
·           11 people pledged to quit
·           10 individuals received Free and Clear Quit Line information
·           6 retailers used signage to discourage sales to minors
·           6 churches implemented the 40 Days to Freedom Cessation Curriculum
·           4 YES Teams established
·           1 multi-media message on school campus

 

Grantees meeting or exceeding annual goals include:  AHDC, CTFA, EBCTCP, Family Services, Future Builders, FYEN, In His Image, Legacy, Madison, MCCTFA, NWATFC, SWACDC, WCAAA, We Care, and Wells Bayou.

Approximately 12% have not met their annual goals.  They have been contacted and made aware of their progress to-date in relation to their grantee colleagues.

Area 4:  Addressing Disparities

The majority of grantees have met or exceeded their annual goals concerning Area 4:  Addressing Disparities (77%).  Activities focused on education, ranging from distributing bilingual material about tobacco laws and disparities to exposing LGBT groups to counter marketing information. 

Details include:

·           46,601 underserved were educated about the ills of tobacco
·           5,661 educated about the ills of tobacco use and disparities
·           4,000 individuals were recipients of a media campaign, using ethnic media outlets
·           963 minorities increased awareness about tobacco, using tobacco education workshops and surveys
·           730 individuals received bilingual material about tobacco laws and disparities
·           300 LGBT young adults exposed to counter marketing information
·           45 youth completed the Keeping It Real Curriculum
·           16 African Americans no longer smoke in their homes, based in part on disparities information
·           13 produced post-test scores documenting knowledge about disparities
·           8 minority organizations promoted tobacco control
·           4 Project Toward No Tobacco church youth groups created
·           3 YES tours focused on disparities
·           3 organizations implemented 40 Days to Freedom Curriculum


Grantees meeting or exceeding annual goals include:  AHDC, Asian Pacific, Calhoun, EBCTCP, Family Services, FYEN, In His Image, Madison, MCCTFA, SWACDC, WCAAA, We Care, and Wells Bayou.

Approximately 23% have not met their annual goals.  They have been contacted and made aware of their progress to-date. 

Conclusion

MISRGO grantees have made significant contributions to tobacco prevention.  They are monitoring their performance and using the data to refine their strategies with the aim of accomplishing their goals and objectives[1].  The overwhelming majority of grantees have exceeded their annual goals. 

The evaluation findings reported in this annual report only scratch the surface of MISRGO grantees’ commitment and dedication to tobacco prevention.  They have established an acknowledged track record of performance.    These findings provide an insight into progress to-date, facilitate MISRGO management and accountability, and assist grantees as they build on their accomplishments.  It also provides a form of transparency as grantee performance is shared with the public.



References

Fetterman, D.M., Tremain, B., and Delaney, L. (2011).  MISRGO Empowerment Evaluation:  June 2011 Annual Report.  San Jose:  Fetterman & Associates.

Fetterman, D.M. and Wandersman, A. (2005). Empowerment Evaluation Principles in Practice.  New York:  Guilford Publications.

Halverson, P. (2012).  Dr. Halverson’s newsletter.  (Friday Letter.  Email to ADH Employee.)  April 27, 1:53 pm.

Starr, G., Rogers, T., Schooley, M., Porter, S., Wiesen, E., Jamison, N. (2005).  Key Outcome Indicators for Evaluating Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. Atlanta, GA:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



MISRGO Grantees:  Names and Abbreviations

Grantee Name
Grantee Abbreviation


Arkansas Human Development Corporation
AHDC
Asian Pacific Resource & Cultural Center
Asian Pacific
Calhoun Heights Community Outreach, Inc.
Calhoun
Coalition for a Tobacco Free Arkansas
CTFA
Evergreen Baptist Church
EBCTCP
Family Service Agency
Family Service
Family & Youth Enrichment Network, Inc.
FYEN
Future Builders, Inc.
Future Builders
Garland County CARES (no longer funded)
Garland
In His Image Youth Development Center
In His Image
Legacy Initiatives
Legacy
Madison County Health Coalition
Madison
Mississippi County Coalition for a Tobacco Free Arkansas
MCCTFA
Southwest Arkansas Community Development Corporation
SWACDC
St. Francis House NWA, Inc. (Northwest AR Tobacco Free Coalition)
NWATFC
We Care of Pulaski County
We Care
Wells Bayou Youth Development, Inc.
Wells Bayou
Women's Council on African American Affairs
WCAAA



MISRGO Statewide Coverage by County – Grantee and YES Teams



[1] See Fetterman and Wandersman, 2005, concerning empowerment evaluation approach.